Monday, October 15, 2007

because you just can't have it all . . .


Linda W. from McAlester, Oklahoma sent in this gem. I'll leave it to the grammar buffs to decipher whether this is a math problem (Price minus quality minus service equals Choose any two?) or just a poor use of hyphenation . . . but I think this is a new favorite . . . it's just so wrong on so many levels . . . it's brilliant! Thanks, Linda!

4 comments:

Ruth said...

I love this! This site will become one of my regulars. Thanks!

Buzz said...

My impression is it's supposed to be a joke. Like a little photocopied jokey thing that might more appropriately be pinned haphazardly in the office manager's cubicle inside Don's Auto Color. Someone thought it was so funny, why not just put it on the sign out front.

I could be wrong.

Anonymous said...

I'm nervous that they actually mean "you can have a good price or good service, but not good quality." You know like the fast/good/cheap work triangle. You can have any two but not the third.

CirĂ­chen said...

There are three possible combinations. Well six if you're counting the order. So I think it's one of those "if Jerry has two different shirts, one pair of pants, one pair of shorts and three pairs of socks, how many outfits can he make" problems.
And I don't understand why anyone cares what Jerry can wear. Plus those problems don't mention if anything's in the wash ;)